The Right Diet for Prediabetes

Eating more fiber-rich foods

Fiber offers several benefits. It helps you feel fuller, longer. Fiber adds bulk to your diet, making bowel movements easier to pass.

Eating fiber-rich foods can make you less likely to overeat. They also help you avoid the “crash” that can come from eating a high sugar food. These types of foods will often give you a big boost of energy, but make you feel tired shortly after.

Examples of high-fiber foods include:

  • beans and legumes
  • fruits and vegetables that have an edible skin
  • whole grain breads
  • whole grains, such as quinoa or barley
  • whole grain cereals
  • whole wheat pasta

Cut out sugary drinks

A single, 12-ounce can of soda can contain 45 grams of carbohydrates. That number is the recommended carbohydrate serving for a meal for women with diabetes.

Sugary sodas only offer empty calories that translate to quick-digesting carbohydrates. Water is a better choice to quench your thirst.

Drink alcohol in moderation

Moderation is a healthy rule to live by in most instances. Drinking alcohol is no exception. Many alcoholic beverages are dehydrating. Some cocktails may contain high sugar levels that can spike your blood sugar.

According to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, women should only have one drink per day, while men should limit themselves to no more than two drinks per day.

Drink servings relate back to portion control. The following are the measurements for an average single drink:

  • 1 bottle of beer (12 fluid ounces)
  • 1 glass of wine (5 fluid ounces)
  • 1 shot of distilled spirits, such as gin, vodka, or whiskey (1.5 fluid ounces)

Keep your drink as simple as possible. Avoid adding sugary juices or liqueurs. Keep a glass of water nearby that you can sip on to prevent dehydration.

Eat lean meats

Meat doesn’t contain carbohydrates, but it can be a significant source of saturated fat in your diet. Eating a lot of fatty meat can lead to high cholesterol levels.

If you have prediabetes, a diet low in saturated fat and trans fat can help reduce your risk of heart disease. It’s recommended that you avoid cuts of meat with visible fat or skin.

Choose protein sources such as the following:

  • chicken without skin
  • egg substitute or egg whites
  • beans and legumes
  • soybean products, such as tofu and tempeh
  • fish, such as cod, flounder, haddock, halibut, tuna, or trout
  • lean beef cuts, such as flank steak, ground round, tenderloin, and roast with fat trimmed
  • shellfish, such as crab, lobster, shrimp, or scallops
  • turkey without skin
  • low fat Greek yogurt

Very lean cuts of meat have about 0 to 1 gram of fat and 35 calories per ounce. High-fat meat choices, such as spareribs, can have more than 7 grams of fat and 100 calories per ounce.